The Battle of Carberry Hill, 1567

Holinshed 1577, Vol. I: The Historie of Scotland, 504-5 (1567)

The Queene gathereth forces.The Queene in the meane time used what diligence shee mighte to gather forces, specially in the Mers and East Louthian, and thinking that the enterprise of the Lords had bin broken and disappoynted, marched from Dunbar on Saterday the fourteenth of Iune, first to Hathington, and there resting till the euen, set forwarde to Gladismore, and taking there deliberation in the matter, they lodged that nyghte at Seaton, and in the morning marched in order of battaile towardes Carbarry hill, Carbarry hill and there choose foorthe a plotte of ground of greate aduantage, appoynting to fyghte on foote, bycause the power of the Lordes in number of Horsemenne, was stronger than the Queenes, and of greater experience.

There were with the Queene and Bothwell the Lordes Seaton, Yester and Borthwike: also the Lardes of Wauchton, Bas, Ormiston, Weaderburne, Blackater, and Langton.

The number of the Quenes Power.They hadde with them also two hundred Harquebusiers waged, and of greate artillerie, some fielde pieces. Their whole number was esteemed to be about two thousande, but the more part of them were commons and Countreymen.

The power of the Lordes. The Earles of Morton, Athol, Mar, Glencarne, the Lordes of Hume, Lindsey, Ruthuen, Simple and Sanquhar. The Lardes of Dru(m)lanrig, Tulibarden, Grange, and yong Sesforde, were assembled togither in Edenburgh with a power like in number to the Queenes, but for the more part consisting of Gentlemen, although not furnished with anye number of Harquebusiers, except a fewe of the Townesmen of Edenburgh, that willingly ioyned with them in that quarrell.

Upon the fiftenth of Iune, they came forthe of the Towne, and approched their aduersaries, but there was Monsieur La Croque, the french Kings Ambassadors, who tooke greate paine in trauelling betwixte the parties to reduce them to some agreemente, but still the Queenes part began to decrease, dyuers shrinking away from hir, so that after it beganne to growe towardes the euening, Bothwell fledde to the Castell of Dunbar,The Queene commeth to the Lords. but the Queene desirous to talke with the Larde of Grange, wente to hym, accompanyed only with one Captaine, and after some talke with hym, shee passed to the Lordes, who tooke hir with them to Edenburgh.

The Hamiltons were on the way commyng to assist the Queene, with seauen or eyghte hunnred Horsemenne, but before they coulde reache the place, the Queene was in the handes of the Lordes, and so they returned.

The Larde of Cragmiller, then prouost of Edenburgh, and Sir Iames Balfour, also the Captaine of the Castell, were ioyned in this co(n)federacie with the Lordes, as shortly after it appeared. The queene is sent to Lochleuen. The Queene after this, was conueyed ouer the Forth and brought to Lochleuen, where she was appoynted to remayne in warde under the saue keepyng of Willia(m) Dowglas Lard of that place. The Erle Bothwell escapyng to Dunbar founde meanes to flee into Denmarke, where he was stayed and committed to pryson, wherein at length he died. Diuers persons afterwardes were apprehended as parties to the murder of the King, and thereupon condemned, were executed, confessing the sayd Earle to be the principall executour of the same murder.

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Holinshed 1587, Vol. II, 1387-8

These remedies being found to defend the queens credit amongst forren princes, other remedies were to be sought for defense of hir owne person against hir owne subiects. Wherefore (after that the earle of Murreie was appointed to remaine as banished beyond the seas in France, whither he tooke his iournie through England) the queene (deliuered of such a feare as he was to hir, & therfore better able to rule, or at least to make better shift, with such other as were coniured, to use Buchanans word, against hir) used what diligence she might to gather forces, especiallie in the Mers and east Louthian.]

And thinking that the enterprise of the lords had beene broken and disappointed, they marched from Dunbar on saturdaie the fourth of Iune, first to Hathington, & there resting till the euen, set forward to Gladismore, and taking there deliberation in the matter; they lodged that night at Seiton, Carbarrie hill and in the morning marched in order of battell towards Carbarrie hill, and there chose foorth a plot of ground of great aduantage, appointing to fight on foot, because the power of the lords in number of horssemen, was stronger than the queens, and of greater experience. There were with the queene and Bothwell, the lords Seiton, Yester, and Borthwicke; also the lards of Wauchton, Bas, Ormiston, Weaderburne, Blackater, and Langton. They had with them also two hundred harquebusiers waged, and of great artillerie some field peeces. Their whole number was esteemed to be about 2000; but the more part of them were commons & countriemen.

The power of the lords. The earles of Morton, Atholl, Mar, Glencarne, the lordes of Hume, Lindseie, Ruthwen, Sempill, Sanquhar; the lards of Drumlangrid, Tulibarden, Grange, and yong Sesford, were assembled togither at Edenburgh with a power like in number to the queens, but for the more part consisting of gentlemen, although not furnished with anie number of harquebusiers, except a few of the townsmen of Edenburgh, that willinglie ioined with them in that quarrell. Upon the fifteenth of Iune, they came foorth of the towne, and approched their aduersaries. But there was monsieur la Croque, the French kings ambassadour, who tooke greate paine, in trauelling betwixt the parties to reduce them to some agreement. Fr. Thin. Bucha. lib. 12 *Who by his interpretor laid before them how carefullie he "had studied for the commoditie & tranquillitie of the publick state of Scotland before this; and that now also he caried the same mind with him. Wherefore he did vehementlie desire (if it were possible) that the matter might be so taken up, for the commoditie of both parties; that it might be ended without force or bloodshed. For the compassing whereof, he would imploie all his trauell, sith the queene also did not refuse to heare the counsell & persuasion of peace. For the more certeintie wherof, he did at that time promise them pardon and vtter forgetfulnesse of all things passed before time; & did with great holinesse there pledge him selfe, that no hurt should fall unto anie"man there, for taking weapon against the highest gouernor.

"After that the interpretor had deliuered these things, the earle of Morton answered, that "he did not take armor against the queene; but against him that had killed the king. "Whome if the queene would deliuer to punishment, or separat him from hir; she should well vnderstand, that they & the rest of hir subiects held nothing more deere vnto them, than to continue in their dutifull obedience: without which granted to them, there could be no agreement made; because they came not thither to craue pardon for anie offence which they had committed (whereunto the earle of Glencarne added) but rather to giue pardon to such as had offended.]"

Wherfore the ambassador Croque returned backe to Edenburgh, and the queens part began to decrease, diuerse shrinking awaie from hir; so that after it began to grow towards the euening, Bothwell fled to the castell of Dunbar. The queene commeth to the lords. But the queene desirous to talke with William Kircadie the lard of Grange, went to him, accompanied onelie with one capteine, and after some talke with him, she passed to the lords, who tooke hir with them to Edenburgh, Fr. Thin. [she being in a short garment, base, & worne, comming a little beneath hir knees (as saith Buchanan) of which lords she requested that they would suffer hir to depart, & not to keepe hir in that sort.] The Hamiltons were on the waie comming to assist the queene, with seuen or eight hundred horssemen; but before they could reach to the place, the queene was in the hands of the lords, and so they returned.

Fr. Thin. The lard of Cragmiller [then prouost of Edenburgh] and sir Iames Balfure also the capteine of the castell, were ioined in this confederacie with the lords, as shortlie after it appeared. The queene is sent to Lochleuin. The queene after this was conueied over the Forth, and brought to Lochleuin, where she was appointed to remaine in ward vnder the safe keeping of William Dowglas lard of that place. The earle Bothwell, escaping to Dunbar, found meanes to flee into Denmarke, where he was staied and committed to prison, wherein at length he died. Diuerse persons afterwards were apprehended as parties to the murther of the king, and thereupon condemned, were executed, confessing the said earle to be the principall executor of the same murther. Fr. Thin. *Leaving the queene therfore in this miserable plight, we will not forget (for the honor she once had) to set downe certeine verses made by Alexander Seton a Scot, in the commendation of hir ancestors, and of hir; who in the first yeares of hir governement used hir selfe to the good liking of all hir subiects. In which verses Seton dooth further meane, that Lesle should hereafter set foorth hir gouernement, as he hath doone that of the other king [sic] before hir. The verses be as followeth.

Lesleus before the preface of his eight booke.
Clara atauis, genus antiquo de sanguine regum,
Nympha Caledonij gloria rara soli,
Maiorum his laudes, totos quos insula ab orbe
Diuisis, toto cernis ab orbe legi.
Hoc illis peperere decus, non gloria regni,
Non genus, aut dives gaza, fauorque virum:
Sed pietatis honos, fidei constantia, morum
Integritas, belli gloria, pacis amor;
Queis tua maiores superet quum viuida virtus:
Quae tamen meritis laus fuit aequa tuis?
Unum hoc Lesleo superest, tua sortia facta
Scribere, consilijs multa peracta suis.
Et mihi sunt verbis saltem tua facta canenda:
A proauis ne sim degener ipse meis.]
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